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Turf Troubles: US Under Siege from Red Thread Disease

US Under Siege from Red Thread Disease

United States: With high-temperature summers, the threat and concern linked to diseases have also spiked. Recently the authorities have sounded alarm regarding the increase reported in Turf Disease.

Recently, a group of experts mentioned that currently the some odd spots can be observed in grass, which could be Red Thread Disease, according to keloland.com.

To address the matter, Ryan Myott with Weller Brothers Landscaping stated, “It’s a tannish, pinkish color. They’re about six to eight inches round.”

Myott attributed this infection to thatch accumulation, which proliferated through no fault of the homeowner or landscaper.

“Thatch results from diligent lawn care,” Myott explained, adding, “Your grass thrives, but when it grows faster than manageable, it sheds, forming thatch. This becomes a haven for turf diseases. You find yourself fostering an ideal environment for disease because of your impeccable lawn care. Then, suddenly, under the right conditions, it manifests.”

Ideal conditions for this disease include heavy rainfall, high humidity, and cooler temperatures, as we’re experiencing currently, according to keloland.com.

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“Myott noted that lawns lagging in nutrients are particularly susceptible,” Myott added. “Even with a fertilizing regimen, the excessive rainfall can deplete essential nutrients.”

So, what are the remedies?

“Firstly, reassess your cultural practices. Avoid evening watering to reduce humidity,” Myott advised. “Ensure you’re using a sharp mower blade and cutting at an optimal height—typically three to three and a half inches. Maintain your fertilizing schedule and observe any improvements; sometimes the disease subsides naturally.”

If issues persist, Myott recommended considering fungicide treatments, as per keloland.com.

Additional advice from Myott includes refraining from watering during rain and mowing frequently, but not when the lawn is wet.

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